Waddaya mean, schools don’t work??

From the introduction (by David Albert) to John Taylor Gatto’s book Dumbing Us Down:

“Central…is the fact that schools are not failing. On the contrary, they are spectacularly successful in doing precisely what they are intended to do, and what they have been intended to do since their inception. The system…funded by the captains of industry, was explicitly set up to ensure a docile, malleable workforce to meet the growing, changing demands of corporate capitalism…[the system] ensures a workforce that will not rebel–the greatest fear at the turn of the 20th century–that will be physically, intellectually, and emotionally dependent upon corporate institutions for their incomes, self-esteem, and stimulation, and that will near to find social meaning in their lives solely in the production and consumption of material goods.”

So, the next time you read a story about yet another middle school student who threatened others with a knife, or how American school children’s test scores have fallen again, or how American graduate schools in math, science, and engineering have to recruit students from overseas because there are literally not enough American applicants to fill available positions, contemplate one of Mr. Gatto’s points about American education:

U.S. labor statistics indicate that the four jobs most widely held by Americans (and the jobs that have seen the most growth in the last 30 years) are

  1. Wal-Mart clerk
  2. McDonald’s burger flipper
  3. Burger King burger flipper
  4. elementary school teacher
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2 comments on “Waddaya mean, schools don’t work??

  1. darkknight9 says:

    “…or how American graduate schools in math, science, and engineering have to recruit students from overseas because there are literally not enough American applicants to fill available positions…”

    *cough* (slicks hair back) HI!!!! LOL Grad school… gimmie gimmie gimme!!!

  2. Helen says:

    I used to share a group subscription to Growing Without Schooling newsletter by John Holt. Then I read several of his books. By the time I got to John Taylor Gatto, I was doubtful that I wanted our children aculturated into mainstream North American society. Fortunately, along the way I found a little subculture called La Leche League. One of LLL’s core beliefs, putting people before things, is a much more radical idea than I realized in the beginning, and quite antithetical to consumerism.

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